Animations with kids – paid in hugs

I get lots of hugs from second-graders these days. It’s pretty nice. Sometimes when I show up in the class or the library, I get four or five little pairs of arms coming around my waist.

Rarely, but it does happen – happened today! – it’s a bit of a manipulative gesture! It means, can you please pick me to animate with right now?

Sometime, it’s a very excited girl who hugs every adult who walks into class.

Sometimes, it’s from sheer glee because they weren’t expecting me to come, and when I do, they come running.

And sometimes – and this is really cute – they’re not really popping a big grin or otherwise looking pleased. But nonetheless, they leave off whatever’s occupying them at their table, and they come ambling over, without really even looking at me, and give me a hug as though checking off an item on their to-do list.

Today, I got the cutest hug ever. I was at McAllister recording with a shy boy, and when we were finished, he kept inching closer and raising his arm to me, but then dropping it. He didn’t look at me, either, just off to the side. I thought he wanted to give me a hug but was too shy. I tapped his shoulder; he raised his arm and dropped it again. I opened my arms, and there! hesitation gone, and we hugged.

I can report that fifth-graders are not such big huggers.

First viewing party – Butterfly story

It was really nice!

IMG_20181217_134829

The kids in the two classrooms said their movie was ‘amazing’, ‘awesome’, ‘terrific’, etc, etc. This was all in front of their parents.

I was really happy with the number of parents who showed. In one of the classrooms, there were like 10! I got surveys from each and every one. What I forgot to do was to ask for their email addresses, so I can keep sending them future videos. But that time will come. I’ll remember next time.

My first partner teacher was so amazing. She was the one who’d written a note to the parents and gotten so many of them to come. Then she gave me a little present at the end 🙂

And I had presents, too, for the kids. The Walt Disney Family Museum had sent them little souvenirs – bookmarks, pencils, postcards. It was great. The only thing with the postcards is all the characters on them are exclusively white. So I am going to use the more landscape-y scenes and figure out what to do with the character postcards.

post cards from the Walt Disney Family Museum
Post cards from the Walt Disney Family Museum

I also made certificates for the kids:

Animation certificates

Do they look bad? The blue/yellow/pink/green shapes that were glued on – I’ve been lugging those around for about 5 or 6 years. They were from some event in the Chesapeake Bay, when I used to work there. I don’t even remember what the event was, but they had cut out all those designs so nicely, and I felt so bad about seeing a whole lot of left-overs all tossed in the trash. So I grabbed them and have finally found a good use for them.

The ‘great job’ stickers I got from Staples. They were in the clearance bins for 75 cents or something, and there were like 72 stickers in each packets. And this is the Staples attached to the mall to which I can take the bus or walk, so I felt really good and resourceful.

And I felt wonderful after the viewings – like we really had done something good and meaningful. I kind of flew into this whole project more on gut instinct, rather than as part of a carefully considered career pathway. But it’s been pretty cool. I feel really entrepreneurial. It’s a nice feeling. I feel like we’re doing something fresh and nice.

The film itself – well, I think next time I’m going to have to do something with the flipping pages. It makes me dizzy to have them fly past all the time. But other than that, I thought the caterpillar scrunching itself along was super cute. And the drawings and everything looked so good. And the kids’ animations are just lovely! And so are their voices.

Here it is: “All About Butterflies!”

So that’s one film down, 5 more to go!

Teaching kids animation

I’ve taught computer animation (in Blender) with the first classroom at Irvin, and today I go back to teach the second classroom.

The kids ooohed and aaahhed the whole time. I hope it goes as well today.

First, we all made an animation together, so they could get the hang of it:

 

And then I sat down with each kid so they could animate their own page:

Makes each kid be the “director” of their own little section of the movie. And it’s nice to see them do something highfalutin with a computer.

Student evaluations

Someone told me that I should do evaluations of these projects, to gauge the effect of the kids’ attitudes on science and computers. So this is what I came up with:

scicomm student evaluations

Nice and straight-forward for my itty-bitty second-graders.

I actually forgot to do this with my first class at Irvin Elementary. But then, after we did a really great lesson on animation, I asked them, “so what do you all think about computers? What do you all think about science?”

I got huge smiles and huge shouts of “fun” back. So too bad I didn’t do a pre-evaluation of their thoughts! But I will at least do a post-evaluation, and I remembered to do the pre-evaluation with the second Irvin class. I told them, you can be honest, you won’t hurt my feelings at all. I got responses all over the place. It will be cool to compare to the post-evaluation.

Animations with kids

Yesterday and today, I visited a classroom at a local school. It was really great. We haven’t started animating yet or anything, or even illustrating.

But we read our story (about butterflies) and talked about life cycles. One kid got carried away and after we talked about caterpillars morphing into butterflies, said something like, “and butterflies change back to caterpillars.” But then a little girl said “nooooooo!” and we got it all cleared up.

They know all the words they need to know: chrysalis, life cycle, etc, etc. They are really good readers, and I had them compare a butterfly and caterpillar, and one kid said, well, they don’t look at all the same, and another kid said, well, the middle part of the butterfly where the wings attach are kind of like the caterpillar. They compare, contrast, they do cause-and-effect. I think they’re great!

And we watched Mr. Turtle, twice, so the kids would know what kind of movie we want to make. They really loved it, so my heart goes out to those second-graders four years ago at Northside Elementary who made it. Wow, they are now in sixth grade!

I told my new second-graders: guess what! There’s actually an American state that has banned plastic bags (I only knew this because of where I spent the summer), and it’s the state with the most number of people, all the way out on the west coast. Any guesses which one? They guessed the United States, Mexico, Florida, New Jersey, Washington D.C., Alaska, Hawaii, and New York, and Texas, and finally we told them it was California. We pulled out a map and did a little geography lesson and showed them all the states they’d mentioned, and then they started saying: we should ban plastic bags in North Carolina, too!

Utter darlings!!

Then, I was explaining how the butterflies fly south in the winter to Mexico, and I don’t know why, but quite a few of the kids had the idea that it’s colder in Mexico than in the US. There was a big globe handy, and I told them about the equator and how the closer you are to the equator, the hotter it is. “So is there really a line around the middle of the earth?” No, there’s no real line, and no words floating around saying “equator”, either.

For some reason, we got on the subject of lava and how underwater volcanoes and ocean islands form. They were really interested in that, so I will keep it in mind for future book ideas.

I told them all to close their eyes as I read them the butterfly story, so that they could imagine what kinds of pictures to draw along with it. One kid spent the whole time telling another kid: you’re not closing your eyes! Close your eyes! You haven’t closed them!

Last but not least, I felt like I should step up to the plate, since my PhD was in satellite images, and show them images of our town of Concord back in 1985 and then in 2011. I got the images all from the huge repository hosted by Google Earth Engine and used the satellite called Landsat 5, which was launched way back in the 1980s! I think it was 1984. And it kept going until 2012. It captured almost three decades of images from all over the world. When you process satellite images, you have to pick out three “colors of light” to use, so I used #1, shortwave infrared, #2, near infrared, #3, blue. Using these three colors together is not 100% accurate as to how the earth looks, but it makes the green of the forests and the blue of the lakes pop.

As soon as I showed them the 2011 image, a kid said: I was born then!

(Gone are the days when I was startled that a kid born in 1999 is older than infancy).

Well, it was great luck that I’d chosen the year of their birth, it was totally by accident. Hearing the glad news, I said: Great! Now you can see what Concord looked like the year you were born! Immediately, a couple of kids started whispering insistently, no, no, I was born in 2010.

I told them: when I went to college, I spent the whole time studying satellite images. Suppose a desert is getting bigger year after year. With the satellite, you can watch that pattern and measure it. It’s really important to know what deserts and rivers are doing. One kid said: it would be very bad if a desert was getting bigger. I took advantage of the moment and told him: that does happen! There’s lots of places around the world where deserts are getting bigger, and it means people might not be able to grow as much food.

And that is maybe the closest we’ll get to discussing “climate change”, because apparently those words aren’t allowed in North Carolina schools, or something of the sort.

And finally I told them a couple of times that I hoped maybe they would all go to college, study about satellites, and then also help to protect the earth. Does it actually sink in when you tell kids things like this? Or do they forget everything when they start partying in the sixth grade?